TAVAS Collection

Fokker D.VII

Arguably the best fighter of WW1, around 3,300 Fokker D.VIIs were produced in the summer and autumn of 1918. 

It was the only aircraft type specifically named in The Armistice, with a clause requiring Germany to surrender every example to the Allies at the conclusion of hostilities. Surviving aircraft saw continued widespread service with many other countries in the years after World War I, after Anthony Fokker personally managed to smuggle numerous examples out of Germany so he could continue his business in Holland. 

Previous Fokker fighters had all used Rotary engines. The D.VII used an inline 6 cylinder Mercedes or BMW engine, which helped make it a very stable gun platform. This, combined with a thick airfoil section that enabled operations at high altitudes and high angles of attack, made the D.VII a formidable air superiority weapon. 

The TAVAS replica is outwardly complete but is awaiting a suitable engine, instruments and covering to become another flying exhibit. 

General Characteristics

Length: 6.954 m (22 ft 10 in) 

Wingspan: 8.90 m (29 ft 2 in) 

Height: 2.75 m (9 ft 0 in) 

Wing Area: 20.50 m2 (221 ft2

Empty Weight: 670 kg (1,477 lb) 

Gross Weight: 906 kg (1,997 lb) 

Powerplant Options:
1 x 160 hp (119 kW) Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder water cooled in-line engine OR
1 x 175 hp (130.5 kW) Mercedes D.IIIa 6-cylinder water cooled in-line engine OR
1 x 185 hp (138 kW) BMW IIIa 6-cylinder water cooled in-line engine

Performance

Maximum speed: 189 km/h (117 mph, 102 knots) 
(BMW IIIa engine – 200 km/h, 124 mph, 108 kn) 

Service ceiling: 6,000 m (19,685 ft) 

Rate of climb (BMW IIIa): 9.52 m/s (1,874 ft/min

Armament

2 x 7.92 mm (.312 in) Spandau LMG08/15 machine guns

ADDRESS

Hangar 106, Eagle Lane 
Caboolture Airfield, QLD
AUSTRALIA 4510

OPENING HOURS

10am – 3pm
Thursday to Sunday

CONTACT US

p. +617 5495 7069
(during opening hours)
e. info@tavas com au

© Copyright The Australian Vintage Aviation Society

Caboolture Warplanes Museum, Caboolture Aviation Museum, Caboolture Museum